Showing posts with label IBM. Show all posts
Showing posts with label IBM. Show all posts

Saturday, December 11, 2010

IBM: What’s Next in Five years? (Video)

IBM unveils its fifth annual "Next Five in Five" -- a list of innovations with the potential to change the way people work, live and play ...

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Consumers Far More Digitally Savvy Than Marketers and Their Agencies

who are years behind in trying to catch up, according to our observation and a study from the IBM Institute for Business Value.


Beyond advertising
Choosing a strategic path to the digital consumer

By Saul Berman, Bill Battino and Karen Feldman

From the Intro:

Four primary trends are blurring the boundaries between traditional brand advertising and direct marketing:

Consumer adoption of new distribution formats – Consumer behavior has changed forever: They are more digital-savvy, willing to provide personal information in return for perceived value, and increasingly ready for permission-based advertising.

A shift in advertiser spending – Spending is moving from traditional advertising toward measurable, interactive marketing. Combined with spending contraction in the new economic environment, this requires smarter advertising, and doing more with less.

Digital migration of platforms – Traditional boundaries are fading, creating opportunities for innovative business models for content platforms.

Emergence of new capabilities – Game changing moves, by both new entrants and existing players, are driving new types of industry innovation, challenging existing business models and accelerating the pace of change.

Sample-Chart: Change to Consumer-Centric Marketing Model



more / Download

via ADWEEK

Saturday, February 28, 2009

Hearst “100 Days of Change” program half way through


Source: Hearst Corp.

Steven Swartz, the president of Hearst newspapers and Senior VP Hearst Corp., explains what is on the way for Hearst Newspaper: [all emphasis by us]
Dear Colleague:

We are at the halfway point in our “100 Days of Change” program and I want to share with you the progress that we’ve made on ideas that fundamentally change the way we do business. Many of you have taken the time to write to me or to the various task force leaders with your thoughts and suggestions, and I’m extremely pleased by the level of energy and cooperation I’ve seen across our newspaper company.

One inescapable conclusion of our study is that our cost base is significantly out of line with the revenue available in our business today. It is equally inescapable that during good times our industry developed business practices that were at best inefficient. For example, all [our] newspapers look pretty much alike, and yet they are not similar enough to allow for efficient production or common content sharing. This must and will change. Another example is that while we have a tremendous opportunity to continue growing our advertising business with small customers, we cannot afford to do so by calling on every advertiser in person every other week and then having a team of artists build and rebuild their ads. We must and will learn to use outbound telemarketing and self-service ad platforms more effectively. I’m confident we can move to rationalize our costs without impairing our ability to give our readers and advertisers the best news and information products in our markets. Even with the cost reductions we are making we have far more resources devoted to reporting local news and information than any other local media outlet. Thus, each of our management teams is at work to complete a fundamental restructuring so we can turn our full attention to product innovation and revenue growth.

Next, we have a revenue and business model problem as opposed to an audience problem. Yes, it is true that fewer people read a newspaper on any given day today than they did in the past, but with the proliferation of media options, consumption of individual media types isn’t what it once was and probably never will be again. Our audience is still the largest of any local news and information media outlet. And when combined with newspapers’ Internet audience, our audience has actually been growing in recent years while our revenue has been declining. So it is our business model that must change in several ways.

We believe we must begin to provide greater differentiation between the content of our free Web sites and the content of our paid product, be that paid product read in print, on a digital device like Amazon’s Kindle, or online. This doesn’t mean we wall off our Web sites behind a paid barrier. Our sites must continue to be the superior and dominant free Web sites in their markets. This means they must offer the best in breaking news, staff and reader blogs, community databases and photo galleries. In fact, we need to expand the number of reporters, editors and photographers who are running a truly great blog, creating a rich dialogue of opinion and data sharing. We must do a far better job of reaching out to prominent citizens in our communities, those who already have a blog and those who don’t, and providing them a prominent platform to state their views. We must develop a rich network of correspondents to help us grow the deepest hyper-local community microsites in our markets. We must do a better job of linking to other great sources of content in our communities. And we must put staff resources behind building those channels of interest that have the greatest potential: those built around pro sports teams, moms and high school sports, to name a few. Exactly how much paid content to hold back from our free sites will be a judgment call made daily by our management, whose mission should be to run the best free Web sites in our markets without compromising our ability to get a fair price from consumers for the expensive, unique reporting and writing that we produce each day.

We must continue to ask readers to pay more for their subscriptions. Our print subscribers don’t pay us enough today that we can say they are actually paying for content. Rather, we only ask readers to pay for a portion of the cost of printing the paper on newsprint and delivering it to the reader’s doorstep. We must gradually, but persistently, change this practice. We ask our readers to pay for their subscriptions on the Kindle today, and we must begin doing the same thing on the iPhone and other advanced smart phones and reading devices that allow us to create a user experience worth paying for. We also need to make our paid product available through the Internet for those who prefer to read it that way. And we must innovate to constantly enhance the reading and advertising experience on these platforms.

Our sales forces must make a transformation similar in scope to the one that IBM underwent in the 90s when it went from a mainframe selling culture to a strategy of being true IT consultants to their clients, even selling them non-IBM products when warranted. In our case, we must fully make the leap from simply selling pages to selling audiences, and in doing so be able to sell packages of products, some of which won’t be our own. The best of our Hearst Newspapers colleagues are already doing this, combining our offerings with those of Yahoo!, Google, MSN, AOL, Ask.com Yahoo! HotJobs and Zillow and networks of local Web sites that we have assembled. All of these products are in our portfolio today. Our advertising task force has created a three-month course of transformational instruction built around a massive sales contest that each of your markets either has launched or is launching. I’m confident that most of our reps will emerge from this process set on a path to become topflight, consultative sellers of audience.

One final overarching thought emerges from our look at advertising sales: we must use third-party printers in all of our markets in order to significantly add more color to our products, not so much for our readers’ needs, but to be more competitive in the battle for advertising dollars in a high-definition world.

Finally, while our savviest advertising customers know that our products still work well for them, as do our most passionate readers, we have done a poor job of telling our story. This becomes even more important as we change our business model. Our communications task force has developed a wonderful new campaign that begins to put us back where we should be—on the offensive about the vital role we play in the politics, social lives and commerce of our communities. We’ll have samples of the campaign available next week on 100DaysofChange.com.

Please discuss these ideas with your colleagues, your managers, our customers and our readers, and let us know what you think. Our goal is to emerge from the “100 Days” with a cost structure we can build our future on and a business model that seeks, by 2011, to get more than 50 percent of our revenue from circulation revenue and digital advertising sales—two areas of our business that we know we can grow and grow consistently as this recession subsides.

I know these are difficult times for those in businesses like ours that are buffeted by so many forces. Yet I know that we have the wherewithal to emerge from this recession with a changed business, yes, but one that is back on a path of growth. Thank you again for your commitment to see us through this journey.

Best regards,

Steve

via / more at WSJ Blog Digits

Saturday, November 29, 2008

IBM's Predictions: Next Five in Five

Trends, innovations and emerging technologies (from IBM Lab's) that have the potential to change the way people work, live and play over the next five years:

- Energy saving solar technology will be built into asphalt, paint and windows
- You will have a crystal ball for your health
- You will talk to the Web . . . and the Web will talk back
- You will have your own digital shopping assistants
- Forgetting will become a distant memory



more / via IBM release

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

R.I.P. PC pMagazine

1981 February / March (Charter Issue)




2008 (the final print edition will be January 2009)



According to Jason Young, the brand PC Magazine makes already 70 % of its revenue online, is overall profitable, represents 80 % of total profit of the PCMag brand (and even more ;-) , after dropping the print edition).

Rafat Ali at paidContent.org
Ziff Davis To Close Print PCMag, Focus On Online; Still Looking For Options For Gaming Division

PCMag Editor-in-Chief Lance Ulanoff: An Open letter to PC Magazine (Print) Readers

Nachtrag 2: more at Foliomag.com

Nachtrag 1: About 26 Years ago ...
Tony Gold [than Lifeboat Associate, New York, NY] invited me to get to know that bunch a people around David Bunnell planning to make a magazine for the new era to come of the IBM PC. We meet had an interesting discussion (and some more to follow).

In 1982 Tony asked Vogel, whether we would be interested to build a joint venture to make this magazine together, and after intensive discussion back and forth, Vogel agreed and as money (on our partners site) was short, Vogel transferred the money needed to an US Account - fortunately to an account we had control of. Not much later I received a phone call from David, that Tony tries to sell the magazine, and finally did so, to Ziff. David told me that most people on board would not move to Ziff, but started to develop a new magazine (the later PC World) and whether I could see them in San Francisco to discuss...

Btw., the deal Tony made Ziff Communications, mostly free advertising, was later and after long and hefty legal battles quite lucrative (search Google). Later Vogel transferred later it's planned contribution of capital back to Germany and for a long time (in fact for ever) US engagement was not on the list for Vogel’s international plans. But, one year later we started PC Personal Magazine for the German speaking market.

With two of the key persons of this time, I’m still in contact and they are still around and active. David Bunnell is - among many other engagement David Bunnell the Co-founder/Editor-in-Chief of eldr.com and Cheryl Woodard runs (among other activities) the consultancy Publishing Business Group.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Tag 2: Web 2.0 Expo Europe, Berlin

Heute standen gleich 23 Sessions auf dem Programm der WebExpo ... wer die Wahl hat, hat die Qual und wie an den Kassen im Supermarkt, beschleicht einem das Gefühl, vielleicht doch in der falschen Schlange / im falschen Track zu stehen?

Better Media Plumbing for the Social Web - Der Routinee Stowe Boyd beschwor das Ende von Social Media als Layer und rief das 'alles fliesst Model' aus und gibt die Parole aus, dass DU immer mitten drin in dieser Strömung sein musst. Blogs are Mainstream und Kommentare und Diskussion wandert ab und das wahre Leben spielt sich im Fluss der Absonderungen von Social Media Apps [Blood flow model] ab, diese (u.a. Comments, Bookmarks, Tweeds) haben ihre eigene ID / URL und docken intelligent da an, wo Identifier and Rezeptoren passen. Offen blieb, wie das mit dem Reinigung/Abtransport von 'Schadstoffen' passiert und es auch ein 'Lymphatische System' innerhalb dieses Flow Models gibt. Und was passiert eigentlich, wenn man von Zeit zu Zeit von diesem Flow abgetrennt ist?

Meine zweite Session an diesem Tag war IBM: Web 2.0 Goes to Work mit Gina Poole, die keinen Zweifel daran gelassen hat, dass IBM den Wert von Social Media für das Unternehmen, die Mitarbeiter und die Kunden & Partner als unverzichtbar einschätzt und die sozio-kulturellen Veränderungen fördert. At IBM Web 2.0 goes to work and it works pretty well for the staff, collaborator, customer and the company, war die Botschaft . Die Präsentation mit eindrucksvollen Zahlen gibt es hier.

(Mehr, vielleicht später.)

Tag 2: Web 2.0 Expo Europe, Berlin

Heute standen gleich 23 Sessions auf dem Programm der WebExpo ... wer die Wahl hat, hat die Qual und wie an den Kassen im Supermarkt, beschleicht einem das Gefühl, vielleicht doch in der falschen Schlange / im falschen Track zu stehen?

Better Media Plumbing for the Social Web - Der Routinee Stowe Boyd beschwor das Ende von Social Media als Layer und rief das 'alles fliesst Model' aus und gibt die Parole aus, dass DU immer mitten drin in dieser Strömung sein musst. Blogs are Mainstream und Kommentare und Diskussion wandert ab und das wahre Leben spielt sich im Fluss der Absonderungen von Social Media Apps [Blood flow model] ab, diese (u.a. Comments, Bookmarks, Tweeds) haben ihre eigene ID / URL und docken intelligent da an, wo Identifier and Rezeptoren passen. Offen blieb, wie das mit dem Reinigung/Abtransport von 'Schadstoffen' passiert und es auch ein 'Lymphatische System' innerhalb dieses Flow Models gibt. Und was passiert eigentlich, wenn man von Zeit zu Zeit von diesem Flow abgetrennt ist? Die Präsentation auf Slideshare.

Meine zweite Session an diesem Tag war IBM: Web 2.0 Goes to Work mit Gina Poole, die keinen Zweifel daran gelassen hat, dass IBM den Wert von Social Media für das Unternehmen, die Mitarbeiter und die Kunden & Partner als unverzichtbar einschätzt und die sozio-kulturellen Veränderungen fördert. At IBM Web 2.0 goes to work and it works pretty well for the staff, collaborator, customer and the company, war die Botschaft . Die Präsentation mit eindrucksvollen Zahlen gibt es hier.

(Mehr, vielleicht später.)

Monday, October 20, 2008

Mein vorläufiges Programm: Web 2.0 Expo

Spontane Änderung vorbehalten!

Tuesday, October 21
8:30 - 11:30AM
Mobile 2.0, Brian Fling

1:00 - 4:00PM
Improving Your Site's Usability - What Users Really Want
Leisa Reichelt

4:20 - 4:45PM
O'Reilly Radar, Tim O'Reilly

Wednesday, October 22
9:00 - 9:50AM
Better Media Plumbing for the Social Web
Stowe Boyd

11:10 - 12:00PM
IBM: Web 2.0 Goes to Work
Gina Poole

12:00 - 2:00PM
Lunch 2.0 Berlin

2:45 - 3:10PM
High Order Bit, Ben Hammersley

3:30 - 4:20PM
Reactive Advertising, Gustav Martner, Gustav von Sydow

4:35 - 5:25PM
The Truth about Social Network Advertising -- The One VCs Don't Want
Scott Rafer

Thursday, October 23
11:00 - 11:50AM
Adding Emerging Media to the Marketing Mix
Dieter Rappold, Tony Douglas

3:40 - 4:30PM
Marketing to Online Communities: Lessons from Early Adopters
Jeff Bates

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

IBM/Impulse-Studie: eBusiness im Mittelstand – IT und Innovationen für Unternehmer

Seit 1999 gibt es die eBusiness im Mittelstand Studie (Durchführung: TechConsult) und so lässt sich der Wandel in den letzten 10 Jahren gut ablesen:

Für 99 % der 1.005 befragten Firmenchefs ist das Internet für ihr Geschäft unverzichtbar und 86 % setzen dabei auf eBusiness, um ihre Wettbewerbschancen zu nutzen und mehr 2/3 weil ihre Kunden dies fordern.

Zum Vergleich: In 1999 waren gerade einmal 30 Prozent der Firmen überhaupt im eBusiness aktiv.

Die Ergebnisse gibt es in der 170-seitigen Präsentation, jeweils unterteilt nach Betriebsgrößen und Art des Betriebs. Ein paar Beispiele:

Schwerpunkt eigener Internet-Aktivität



Welche Geschäftsprozesse werden / sollen zukünftig abgedeckt werden



Warum entscheidet man sich für eBusiness



Dies und viel mehr gibt es in der kompletten Studie hier (170 Seiten, als PDF-Download)

Monday, April 28, 2008

IBM Studie: Innovation der Medien

Heute hat IBM Global Business Services eine qualitative Studie deutscher Media- and Entertainment Practice vorgestellt, entstanden in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Zentrum für Evaluation und Methoden der Universität Bonn.

Hier ein paar Auszüge:

Nutzungstrends


Quellen für Informationen & Vorbereitung für Kaufentscheidungen



Für mich das wichtigste Medium


Selbst Aktiv im Internet - Prosumer



plus
- Fernsehen – Quo Vadis
- Zeitalter des Prosumenten
- Nutzergeneriert gewinnt
- Video-U
- Auswirkung auf die Werbeindustrie

Die IBM Studie 'Innovationen der Medien' als PDF (Download)

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Deutsche sind bald Weltspitze im Web - so ein Unsinn!

Erst habe ich über Turi2, bei Welt.de gelesen, dass Deutschland bald Weltspitze im Web ist und die beziehen sich auf das EIU / IBM e-readiness ranking 2008 (PDF)... so weit so gut.

Doch wer zieht aus dieser Studie solche Schlüsse? Wer verzapft so einen Unsinn? Es ist Lars Winckler, aber ist das Qualitäts-Journalismus ... ?

Zu den Fakts bzw. Rankings für Deutschland:

- 2008: Platz 14 Wert 8,39

- 2007: Platz 19 Wert 8,00

- 2006: Platz 12 Wert 8,34

- 2005: Platz 13 Wert 8,03

- 2004: Platz 13 Wert 7.83

- 2003: Platz 13 Wert 8.15

- 2002: Platz 8 Wert 8.25

- 2001: Platz 12 Wert 7.51

Ob die Rankings vergleichbar sind, weiß ich nicht (W.C.), aber wenn man diese Datenreihe 'fortsetzt' dauert es wahrscheinlich ewig, bis Deutschland (nicht) auf Platz Nr. 1 ist!

Früherer Eintrag:
e-readyness: India, China close digital gap

Friday, February 08, 2008

Unterstützung für OpenID von Google, IBM, Microsoft, VeriSign und Yahoo!

OpenID verkündete gestern stolz seine gewichtigen Unterstützer im neuen Corporate Member Board.

Bisher unterstützen laut OpenID über 10,000 Websites einen OpenID log-in - es bleibt noch viel zu tun ...

via marketwire

Sunday, November 11, 2007

New IBM Study: The End of Advertising as We Know It

Bill Battino, Saul J. Berman, Andreas Neus and Louise Shipnuck authored IBM Global Business Services new Business Value study

The End of Advertising as We Know It

on the future of advertising and the kind of changes advertisers and media have to deal with sooner than later!

O.K., if you are awake and care about your business, none of the 'challenges' the report describes should be new to you, but the radicalness and speed of this changes should alert you even more, make you a demolitionist on your business rules and procedures and what you learned and preach today .

IBM Predictions are based on a global surveys of more than 2,400 consumers and 80 advertising experts. According to the report four change drivers will shifting and reallocate control

- control of attention
- creativity
- measurement and
- advertising inventories



From the Summary:
Imagine an advertising world where…

- spending on interactive, one-to-one advertising formats surpasses traditional, one-to-many advertising vehicles
- a significant share of ad space is sold through auctions and exchanges
- Advertisers know who viewed and acted on an ad, and pay based on real impact rather than estimated “impressions.”
- Consumers self-select which ads they watch and share preferred ads with peers
- User-generated advertising is as prevalent (and appealing) as agency-created spots

more

But, advertising is not going away, as you can see from

IBM’s new global advertising forecast by categories



Get the complete Study (PDF)

or the Executive Summary (PDF)

Wednesday, June 20, 2007

Blogging IBM - Catalog & Guidelines

IBM kann sicher als gutes Beispiel dafür gelten, wie Unternehmen & Institutionen mit und aus Social Media Nutzen für Mitarbeiter, Kunden und das Unternehmen schöpfen.

Wer sich einmal umschauen will, welche der 3.000 MitarbeiterInnen auf IBM blogen



kann das hier im IBM employee blog directory.

Auch die IBM Blogger Guideline zeigen das IBM die Idee Social Media internalisiert hat ...


via David Meermann Scott (Web Ink Now)

Saturday, March 31, 2007

Patrick McGovern Insights Not Only for IDG

interviewed in a story on 'InfoWorld Leads Way as IDG Goes Head-First on Web' from Mark Glaser at MEDIASHIFT:

Just one take from interview:

Glaser: "You’ve been in technology journalism almost from the start, so you’ve seen a lot of changes. How profound is the change brought by the Internet?"

McGovern: We’ve made an interesting re-definition about what business we’re in. We always thought of ourselves as [print] publishers who did websites and conferences. Now the website typically has a bigger audience than print, and it’s growing much more rapidly. We used to be a publishing company with ancillary websites and events, but now we’re a web-centric information company, and we have ancillary activities like print publications and events.

That’s a big change, because in the past, we’d have a meeting with our publishing heads, and we’d talk about all the trends online — the growth in revenues and growth in audience. And advertisers were saying they were getting better ROI in online advertisements. The future, and most of our revenue by 2020, will be online. And the publishers would nod their head, and go back to their office and get four or five urgent messages on their desk about IBM cancelling print ads, ‘Could you rush out and have dinner with the IBM head to convince them not to do that? We got another call from Microsoft and they’re cutting back as well.’

They have to fight all these fires because of print, and you have to protect that, prevent that from eroding too quickly. As they were spending their time protecting history, they weren’t investing as much and getting the right people online. Now we’re redefining the business to say your website is your primary business, and you can do print if it has a clear and useful purpose.

In the past when we’d launch a new subject, we’d launch it as a new magazine, and put millions of dollars into selling subscriptions, and go out and get people to buy advertising. Today we would put it out as a website, publicize it to get a lot of visitors, use viral marketing, get people to come back and say it’s a great site. And through newsletters and webcasts, we can get a lot of registered information on the users.

When we get 50,000 or 60,000 registered users, we can take a random sample of those and ask, ‘Would you like a magazine or a newspaper on the subject? Is so, what frequency and what format and how much would you pay for it?’ And if there’s enough demand we could go to the advertisers and say, ‘Here’s the audience, here’s their buying power, would you be interested in buying advertising in a print publication?’ ..."

more ...

My heading for this article would have been 'InfoWorld Follows the Way IDG Goes Head-First on Web' - a Way Others should consider too!

via rexblog.com
When everyone blogs, all sides of a story can be aired

Thursday, March 15, 2007

eMartin.net Newsletter März / March 2007

Die Inhalte des aktuellen, deutschsprachigen eMartin.net Newsletter März 2007

[ 1 ] Irgendwie verrückt, diese Verlagsbranche
[ 2 ] IBM Studie: Vier Business Modelle für Media
[ 3 ] Transformation geglückt: Beispiel IDG
[ 4 ] Hohes Wachstum bei Chinas Werbeaufwendungen
[BLOG] Themen im Weblog Februar - Maerz 2007 (Auswahl)
[TIPP] Weblogs und Journalismus: Konkurrenz, Ergänzung oder Integration?
[TIPP] Deutschsprachige Medienblogs
[TIPP] US Report: The State Of The News Media 2007
[TIPP] eBook: Wirtschafts- und Finanzrecherche im World Wide Web '07
[TIPP] Präsentation 'Medien in Serbien' - Update

Link zum aktuellen Newsletter (März 2007)

Das Archiv mit über 4.000 Eintragungen und Links (deutsch)

Content of the eMartin.net Newsletter March 2007 International

[ 1 ] IBM Study: Innovating and Enabling New Business Models
[ 2 ] The State of the News Media 2007
[ 3 ] Best Practice: Transformation at IDG
[ 4 ] Audit Bureau of Circulations Wants More Business
[ 5 ] Ad Spending in China: Healthy Growth
[ 6 ] How Ad Execs See the New Media Ecosystem for Budgeting and Media
[Blog] HEM Weblog on Media, Marketing &Internet Feb. - March 2007
[TIP] German language Media Blogs
[TIP] Update Presentation 'Media in Serbia'

Access this Newsletter (March Issue 2007)

The Archive with more than 4.000 entries and links (English)

Monday, February 19, 2007

New Business Models for Media

Saul J. Berman, Steven Abraham, Bill Battino and Louisa Shipnuck from the IBM Institute for Business Value published a study on

Navigating the Media Divide:
Innovating and Enabling New Business Models


4 Business models for the near future


(c) IBM - from the study

From the summary:
"A new media world has arrived. Pioneered by teens and gadget-savvy professionals, it has quickly spread into virtually every consumer segment, and started to encroach on traditional media ... to examine the inherent tension between new and traditional media and explore future industry scenarios, we conducted a comprehensive study that included interviews with leaders of media companies and an in-depth analysis of the factors that are shaping the industry outlook. "

IBM's recommendations:
1. Put consumers at the center of your business and boardroom.
2. Convert consumer data into competitive advantage.
3. Give control to get share.
4. Deliver experiences, not just content.
5. Leverage virtual worlds.
6. Innovate business models.
7. Invest in interactive, measurable advertising services and platforms.
8. Redefine partnerships, while mitigating fallout.
9. Shift investment from traditional business to new models.
10. Create a flexible business design.

Download Executive Summary (PDF)

Download Business Value Study (PDF)

via JD Lasika on Social Media

The Australian: Old vs new may cost billions

Saturday, November 18, 2006

Getrübter Blick: Second Life

Stefan Krüger (Chefredakteur wuv) betreibt in seinem aktuellen Editorial Aufklärung für die geneigten Leser des Branchenmagazins werben & verkauf.

Er sieht das zur Zeit äußerst populäre Online-Spiel

'Second Life' (Linden Lab)

eines der wenigen Spiele, die man auch unter den Augen seiner/s ChefIn im Büro spielen darf und dafür gelobt und bezahlt wird,

"inhaltlich 'irgendwo' zwischen 'Deutschland sucht den Superstar', 'Pleiten, Pech und Pannen' und 'Big Brother' ...

(Na ja, dann vielleicht dann doch lieber die Fehleinschätzung, dass hier eine virtuelle Gemeinschaft ihre 'Midlife-Crise" pflegt und auslebt.)

Richtig ist, das 'Big Brother' and 'American Idol' ins Second Life eingezogen sind und dass Reuters, Adidas, Nissan, IBM, Vodafone u.v.a.m. schon da sind ...

P.S.
IBM hat angekündigt in den nächsten Jahren rd. 10 Mio USD in virtuelle Welten wie Second Life investieren wollen, aber das würde IBM - im Gegensatz mir - auch im Falle eines Scheiterns nicht in Existenznöte bringen.
Related Posts with Thumbnails